Research Report

Mapping Richmond's Buddhist Community (2003)

Richmond Virginia, once the capitol of the Confederate States of America, isn't the first place you'd think to look for Buddhist temples. But though many Richmondites still enjoy the annual Civil War reenactments, and take pride in the old time religion, the even older religion of the Buddha has succeeded in quietly making a place for itself, here in the South. There are now Buddhist groups practicing in Japanese, Korean, Chinese, Tibetan, Burmese, Vietnamese, Cambodian, and American lineages, in Richmond. The central subject of my study is Ekoji Buddhist Sangha, a distinctive temple in...

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Growing Religious Diversity in South Carolina: Implications for the Palmetto State (2003)

Abstract

This paper documents the growth of religious diversity in South Carolina, drawing on interviews with members from the traditions represented, previous scholarly research on religion in South Carolina, newspaper articles, census data and interviews with religion reporters and educators across the state. After presenting basic outlines and historical sketchs of each faith in South Carolina, the paper goes on to explore the implications of this growing diversity for a Southern "Bible Belt" state like South Carolina, highlighting controversies over...

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UNESCO Conference: "2003: The 3000th Anniversary of Zoroastrian Culture" (2003)

Based on a proposal submitted by his Excellency the President of Tajikistan to UNESCO of United Nations, the year 2003 was officially recognized as "2003: the 3000th Anniversary of Zoroastrian Culture." Tajikistan and several other countries celebrated this immense event by organizing different programs to spread the teachings of Ashu Zartosht, the prophet and founder of Zoroastrianism, to the world. The California Zoroastrian Center (CZC) also organized and provided additional educational programs and seminars to expand and spread the philosophy of Ashu Zartosht. The CZC, in partnership...

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Building Bridges of Understanding: An Interfaith Curriculum of the California Council of Churches (2003)

In 2002 the California Council of Churches made a decision to respond to the episodes of violence and mistaken identity that followed 9/11. Their chosen response was a curriculum study guide on six of the world’s religions, which was funded by The California Endowment, Presbyterian Church (USA) Peacemaking Program, United Methodist Church Peace and Justice Program, Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) Reconciliation Fund and Southern California Ecumenical Council.

Building Bridges of Understanding focuses on six major faith traditions found in California, and was designed...

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"The Clock Can Never Be Turned Back": The Formation and Growth of Interfaith Groups in the Greater Boston Area (1993)

"Something new and something good is happening," declared an African-America minister at an interreligious worship service in Boston. "We are discovering each other by bringing our gifts together and offering them to God," echoed a white Unitarian-Universalist minister at the same worship service. Reflecting upon this worship service with participants from Protestant, Roman Catholic, Unitarian-Universalist, Jewish, Muslim, Hindu, Buddhist, and Neo-Pagan faith traditions, a Protestant minister stated emphatically, "The clock can never be turned back!"[1]... Read more about "The Clock Can Never Be Turned Back": The Formation and Growth of Interfaith Groups in the Greater Boston Area (1993)

Religious Diversity in Austin, TX: Come for the Economy, Stay for the Attitude (2003)

According to the 2002 Census, 657, 688 people live within Austin city limits. Of that population, 129,163 are foreign born–about 19.64 percent.[1] This places Austin twenty-fifth on a list of large American cities with the highest percentages of foreign-born residents.[2] Because the Census measures only household population, these figures generally do not reflect the 4,500 international students at the University of Texas who have come from 115 different countries. Politically, Austin is considered by many...

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Finding Our Place Conference: Building Social Cohesion in the Midst of Diversity and Migration (2003)

Purpose and Methods

This week-long conference brought together teams of people from selected cities around the globe. The Partner City project is an endeavor by the Council for the Parliament of World Religions to stimulate interfaith work around the globe by developing diverse teams working together in cities and a network of these cities. This conference, the second of such Goldin Institute events is designed to build capacity and offer a wealth of networking opportunities. The methodology of the conference is based upon listening, first to immigrants and...

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The Emerging Latino Muslim Community in America (2003)

This article has previously appeared in the High Plains Society for Applied Anthropologists Fall 2003 Journal. With the consent of the publishers, it is reprinted here. Please forward any comments, questions or feedback to the author, Abbas Barzegar, at abbas.barzegar@colorado.edu.

Introduction

In recent years, discussion on the role of Islam in American society as portrayed in mainstream discourse, has been mostly associated with the ‘war on terrorism’, and, as such has been concerned with political conflicts abroad and the threat of... Read more about The Emerging Latino Muslim Community in America (2003)

Embodying Ethics, Performing Pluralism: Volunteerism Among Ismailis in Houston, TX (2003)

Abstract

Muslims in America reflect the diversity of cultures, ethnicities, traditions, and practices that constitutes the global Muslim community. They engage with the American context in which they are situated in a multiplicity of ways. Drawing on ethnographic fieldwork conducted in the summer of 2003, I explore how voluntarism among Shia Imami Nizari Ismaili and Sunni Muslims in Houston, Texas provides a lens to examine how they negotiate pluralism within their communities and in American society, and how they manage the intersection of religion,...

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Muslims and Lutherans in the Twin Cities Conference (2002)

Dr. Mark Swanson, Associate Professor of Islamic Studies and Director of the Islamic Studies Program at Luther Seminary, was a member of the planning committee for a conference held in St. Paul in May 2002, entitled "Muslims and Lutherans in the Twin Cities." He explained that the impetus for the conference came from the Lutheran communities of St. Paul and Minneapolis. They had noticed the presence of many Muslims in their neighborhoods, and realized that they ought to know more about their neighbors.

The topic was broached by grassroots participants at the annual meetings of...

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Twin Cities' Responses to September 11 Attacks (2002)

On September 11, 2001, a terrorist attack in New York resulted in the deaths of thousands. The innocent Americans killed in this attack were of various faiths, and the broader victims include everyone who considers America home, regardless of ethnicity or religious tradition. That awful day propelled the discussion of religion into the American public square. From new heights of fear of unfamiliar practices to a new awareness of the variety of religious communities in the United States, people all over the country who had no previous knowledge of the religious diversity in...

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