Women

In the U.S.: Muslims, Sikhs, Arabs, South Asians Face Threats, Violence - Immediate Backlash

September 14, 2001

Source: ABC News

http://abcnews.go.com/sections/us/DailyNews/wtc_backlash_010914.html

On September 14, 2001, ABC News reported on "Arab-Americans Feel Backlash: Firebombs, Name-Calling, Threats Reported." Continuing coverage included an chat with Al-Haaj Ghazi Khankan, director of Interfaith Affairs at the Islamic Center of Long Island and executive director for the Council...

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Preserving Tunica-Biloxi Language and Culture

August 26, 2001

Source: The Times-Picayune

On August 26, 2001, The Times-Picayune featured an article on Donna Madere Pierite of New Orleans, a teacher and advocate of preserving Native American languages and culture. "She teaches French and Spanish at Abramson High School and also finds time to be the language program coordinator for the Tunica-Biloxi, working to keep the tribe's speech, songs, stories and culture alive... 'When I go to schools and do this little presentation, an adult will come up to me afterward with tears in their eyes,' she said. 'They said, 'I too...

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Utah Man Convicted of Polygamy

August 25, 2001

Source: The Boston Globe

On August 25, 2001 The Boston Globe reported that Tom Green of Utah, "a man with five wives and 30 children, was sentenced...to five years in prison...Polygamy is an open secret in Utah and elsewhere in the West, where there are an estimated 30,000 people practicing plural marriage." Green took the stand and "made it clear he has no regrets." He was sentenced "to five years on each charge he faced - four bigamy charges and one for failing to support his family. The sentences will run concurrently...He is still awaiting trial on...

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Activists Use Taxi Ads to Push for Ordination of Women

August 14, 2001

Source: The Boston Globe

On August 14, 2001, The Boston Globe reported that "a local organization of Catholic women [Massachusetts Women-Church] has rented signs atop 20 Boston taxicabs demanding that the Vatican allow women to be ordained as priests...In other cities, activists have rented billboards, and one woman disrupted a bishops' meeting in Washington...The church has cited the fact that Jesus did not have female apostles as a justification [for not ordaining women], and Pope John Paul II has said the matter is not open for debate."

Hindu Women Honor their Brothers

August 3, 2001

Source: Newsday

On August 3, 2001, Newsday reported on Rakhi Day. "Rakhi Day, formerly known as Raksha Bandhan, is a Hindu ritual created especially for sisters to honor their brothers. But through the years, the tradition expanded to include men and women who share a bond, even if they're not related...Though customs and rituals associated with Raksha Bandhan differ from region to region, the celebration of the brother-sister bond catches the same fervor in almost every Indian home."

Woman Forbidden to Carve Hopi Figures at Museum

July 30, 2001

Source: The Seattle Times

On July 30, 2001, The Seattle Times reported on Hopi carver Debbie Drye. "Some say the men [who objected to her demonstrations at the Heard Museum] are jealous of Drye's talent. But the Hopi Cultural Preservation Office maintains it's an issue of religion. Traditionally, Hopi men carve kachinas and give them to women as representations of Kastina, the spirit of procreation, thus excluding women from carving the sacred objects...Male carver Forest Chimerica will replace Drye...Chimerica says he does not object to women carvers, but...

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Ancient Ketubah Makes a Comeback

July 29, 2001

Source: Star Tribune

On July 29, 2001, the Minneapolis Star Tribune reported on the ketubah, one of the world's earliest prenuptial agreements, created by rabbis many years ago in the desert. "It was designed to protect women in the case of divorce or if the husband died," said a modern-day ketubah maker. "More than 2,000 years later, these wedding contracts have become an essential part of every Jewish wedding, evolving both as legal documents and as highly decorated works of art that reflect the diverse artistic cultures of the diaspora."

Harvard Divinity School Hires First Chair of Buddhist Studies

July 28, 2001

Source: The Boston Globe

On July 28, 2001, The Boston Globe reported that Harvard Divinity School "is poised to hire its first chair of Buddhist studies. The school has chosen Janet B. Gyatso, a professor of religion at Amherst College. " The Globe published an interview with Gyatso, who is currently researching issues relating to sex and gender in Buddhism.

Kentucky Court Ruling Allows Discrimination in Faith-Based Organization

July 25, 2001

Source: The New York Times

On July 25, 2001, The New York Times reported that "in a case with implications for [Bush's faith-based initiative], a federal court in Kentucky ruled against Alicia Pedreira in a lawsuit accusing the Kentucky Baptist Homes for Children of discrimination...Ms. Pedreira, a lesbian, was told she was fired...because the 'homosexual lifestyle is contrary to Kentucky Baptist Homes for Children core values.' Officials at the American Civil Liberties Union...joined her in the lawsuit...The home receives financing from Kentucky."

Conservative Peoria Bishop Appointed to Newark Diocese

July 25, 2001

Source: The New York Times

On July 25, 2001, The New York Times reported that Bishop John J. Myers, of Peoria, Illinois, has been appointed as archbishop of Newark, New Jersey, a much larger and more diverse community than the rural one of Peoria. Bishop Myers "has become the darling of church conservatives, who see him as a bulwark against American Catholics who advocate greater flexibility...Joanne Bloom, a retired...teacher who serves on the board of the Roncalli Society, a group in Peoria that encourages discussion of church teachings, said Bishop Myers...

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Profile on Hindu Doctor

July 21, 2001

Source: Newsday

On July 21, 2001, Newsday reported on Dr. Uma Mysorekar, President of the Hindu Temple Society of North America, who contributed $1 million to help finance its community center. Born in India, she has a private gynecology practice and is heavily involved in social work. Her philosophy is, "Every human being must have a religion, no matter which religion."

Woman Forbidden to Carve Hopi Figures at Museum

July 18, 2001

Source: The Arizona Republic

On July 18, 2001, The Arizona Republic reported on Hopi carver Debbie Drye, who works at the Heard Museum. "The Hopi Cultural Preservation Office objected [to demonstrations by her of her work], insisting that a woman carver should not demonstrate at a Native American museum. And [museum] officials...have agreed to use a substitute demonstrator...The Hopi Cultural Preservation Office maintains it's an issue of religion."

Apology for Hindu-Bashing by Chicago Radio Host

July 17, 2001

Source: News India Times

http://www.parlato.org/articles/archive/newsindiatimes20010706.html

News India Times reported that "a campaign launched by Chicago radio and TV talk-show host Tony Brown purports to 'inform' the American public about Hinduism...Among other things, Brown said:...Nazism emanated from Hinduism...Untouchability [is] 'widely practiced' in India...[and] female children and women of lower castes are forced into prostitution...Brown...

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Female Muslim Firefighter Allowed to Wear Headscarf

July 12, 2001

Source: Council on American-Islamic Relations

On July 12, 2001, the Council on American-Islamic Relations reported that "in a first-of-its-kind case of workplace religious accommodation, a female Muslim firefighter in Maryland will be allowed to wear a religiously-mandated Islamic headscarf while on duty...The decision by Montgomery County Fire and Rescue Service (MCFRS) to allow the scarf came following discussions with the Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR)."

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