Interfaith

Zoning for Religious Structures to Improve

August 5, 2000

Source: Los Angeles Times

On August 5, 2000, the Los Angeles Times reported that a bill passed both houses of Congress unanimously last week that "would make it more difficult for cities to use zoning laws to keep churches, temples and mosques out of their neighborhoods. President Clinton is expected to sign it into law." Further, "another portion of the bill seeks to ensure that people in institutions, such as mental hospitals and prisons, can freely practice their faith as long as it does not undermine security, discipline or order in their institutions...

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Religious Summit

August 5, 2000

Source: The Houston Chronicle

On August 5, 2000, The Houston Chronicle reported that "More than 1,000 religious leaders will assemble for the Religious Summit in New York on Aug. 28 to develop plans for cooperating with the United Nations on peace, poverty and environmental issues. Among the leaders scheduled to attend will be Cardinal Francis Arinze, president of the Vatican's Pontifical Council for Interreligious Dialogue; Buddhist Nobel Prize nominee Samdech Preah Maha Gosananda; and Abdullah Salaih Al-Obadaid, secretary general of the Muslim World...

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Cyberreligion

August 5, 2000

Source: The Atlanta Journal and Constitution

On August 5, 2000, The Atlanta Journal and Constitution reported on the First Church of Cyberspace and its pastor, the Rev. Charles Henderson. The four-year-old congregation includes members of a variety of religions, including Christian, Jew, Pagan, and atheist. "It's tremendously diverse," said ordained Presbyterian pastor Henderson from the church's office in New York. "It has pagans, Wiccans, liberals, gays, straight --- that's what makes it so exciting." Henderson's church is part of a growing trend in...

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Friendship Heals

August 3, 2000

Source: The Atlanta Journal and Constitution

On August 3, 2000, The Atlanta Journal and Constitution reported on the friendship that has grown between Indian immigrant Kesturkoppal Muralidhara and his Mormon neighbor Nancy Beaman. His wife, Vadewattee Muralidhara, was "gunned down with eight others a year ago by day trader Mark Barton." It was too much for his 19-year-old son and he to return to their home, so the two moved. Since then, the grief-stricken Muralidhara has had a hard time making new friends, eating his meals, and practicing medicine at his...

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10 Commandments Monuments Barred from Capital Lawns

August 1, 2000

Source: The Courier-Journal

On August 1, 2000, The Courier Journal reported that "In a written order that follows his ruling last week from the bench, U.S. District Judge Joseph Hood has struck down as unconstitutional a state resolution calling for a monument to the Ten Commandments on the Capitol grounds." In his order, Hood found "the resolution failed all three constitutional tests it needed to pass." These tests were that it had a "secular purpose, that its primary effect was secular and that it did not 'foster' a government entanglement with...

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Religion Welcome in the Literary World

August 1, 2000

Source: Los Angeles Times

On August 1, 2000, the Los Angeles Times reported that there has been an increase in the amount of new fiction being published that is focused on religion. In the article "Literary World is Making More Room for Religion; With Cultural Diversity an Ever-Growing Presence, Writers (and Readers) are Embracing Themes of Spirituality," Janet Silver, editor in chief for Houghton Mifflin in Boston commented that, "The industry is opened to groups not represented in the past. You find writers from cultures that define themselves by...

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Santa Fe Promotes Tolerance

August 1, 2000

Source: The Houston Chronicle

On August 1, 2000, The Houston Chronicle reported that "Two billboards that declare Santa Fe to be "no place for hate" will greet people driving down this town's main drag beginning August 10. Community leaders hope the signs will help dispel the perception that residents of this small Galveston County town may be less than tolerant toward people unlike themselves." After recent allegations involving anti-Semitism and other acts of discrimination, "the school district has accepted the Anti-Defamation League's offer to present...

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Increasing Diversity in Portland, Maine

July 30, 2000

Source: The Boston Globe

On July 30, 2000, The Boston Globe published an article entitled "A City's Changing Face Aided by Program to House Refugees; Immigrants Bring Ethnic Diversity, New Challenges, to Portland, Maine." Albert T. Chamblerain, property manager at the low-income housing development Riverton Park, explained that while "Once a thoroughly white city in the country's second whitest state, Portland is on its way to becoming a miniature 'United Nations.'" While Census data has yet to be released, it is clear that Portland has changed...

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10 Commandments Monuments Barred from Capital Lawns

July 30, 2000

Source: The Washington Post

On July 30, 2000, The Washington Post reported that a "federal judge issued a temporary injunction Friday barring Indiana from erecting a Ten Commandments monument on the Statehouse lawn." The state has not decided if it will appeal, said a spokeswoman for the governor. She added that "We believe that because this monument was to be displayed in a historical context it would be constitutional." Indiana Civil Liberties Lawyer Ken Falk commented that "The judge indicated that...the monument lacks a secular purpose and it has the...

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Zoning Bill Aids Churches

July 28, 2000

Source: The San Diego Union-Tribune

On July 28, 2000, The San Diego Union-Tribune published an article entitled "Bill Targets Zoning that Bans Churches."

Hate Crimes in Los Angeles

July 28, 2000

Source: Los Angeles Times

On July 28, 2000, the Los Angeles Times reported that "More than a quarter of all hate crimes in the state last year occurred in Los Angeles, nearly three times as many as in the next-highest city, according to a report released Thursday by the state attorney general's office. The state's 1,962 hate crimes, occurring at a rate of more than five a day last year, represent an increase of 12% over the previous year. The total is the second highest since California began keeping track in 1994, the report stated."

"Last year...

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Atlanta's Diverse Religious Landscape

July 27, 2000

Source: The Atlanta Journal and Constitution

On July 27, 2000, The Atlanta Journal and Constitution reported that "the city has become home to some of the strongest, largest churches in America. The suburbs, home to some even older churches, have their own healthy congregations." Some examples include:

"Peachtree Presbyterian Church on Roswell Road is the largest mainline Presbyterian church in the country...Mount Paran Church of God for years has led its denomination in members and its pastor emeritus, the Rev. Paul Walker, is the general...

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Faith's Role in Medicine Debated

July 26, 2000

Source: Star Tribune

On July 26, 2000, the Star Tribune published an article entitled "Finding a Role for Faith in Medicine; Both Doctors and Counselors Observe That a Patient's Religious Beliefs May be Helpful, But They Caution Against Making Faith a Formal Part of Treatment." In a recent study, "Seventy-five devout Christians were asked to take part in an unusual experiment: Researchers had them pray for 466 strangers, each of whom had been hospitalized with serious heart problems." When those who were prayed for were compared to a control group that...

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House Backs Display of National Motto

July 25, 2000

Source: The Denver Post

On July 25, 2000, The Denver Post published an article about the recent House of Representatives vote which urged the "display of the national motto - 'In God We Trust' - in public buildings. The House action came on a voice vote on a resolution introduced by Rep. Bob Schaffer, R-Fort Collins, who acknowledged his measure was inspired by the 5-to-1 vote of the [Colorado] state school board on July 6." Schaffer commented that "This is our national motto, not a prayer, This is the motto right before us. This is not a controversial...

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CD Project Joins Together Catholic and Buddhist Monks

July 24, 2000

Source: The Courier-Journal

On July 24, 2000, The Courier Journal of Louisville, KY published an article about a collaboration between Buddhist and Catholic monks. The project is a result of the work of Louisville musician Michael Fitzpatrick, who was "so deeply moved by a 1996 gathering of Catholic and Buddhist monks at the Abbey of Gethsemani that he wanted to capture some of that feeling in music. The result is the CD "Compassion," released last month, which blends Tibetan and Western monastic chants, classic pieces of Western religious music and...

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