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    Religious Discrimination in the Military (2004)

    If President George Bush’s comment in Sept. 2001 that the War on Terror was an American “crusade” led to an international controversy on the possible anti-Islamic undertones of American foreign policy, then in 2003-2004 these concerns have only increased. This year three high profile scandals brought international attention to possible tensions between the U.S. military and Islam: the General Boykin controversy, the Abu Ghraib prison scandal, and the arrest of prominent Muslim militairy chaplain Capt. James Yee.

    The General Boykin Controversy...

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    Religious Symbols in the American Public Square (2004)

    Judge Roy Moore and the Ten Commandments

    The role of religion in the public square made national headlines in 2003-2004 as Judge Roy Moore, soon known as the “Ten Commandments Judge,” refused to obey official court orders to remove a 2.6 ton monument of the Ten Commandments from the front of the Alabama courthouse. Moore was sued on October 30, 2001 by the ACLU of Alabama and the Americans United for Separation of Church and State, who argued that the statue amounted to an official state endorsement of religion. Moore countered that the monument honored the...

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    Controversy over the Headscarf (2004)

    The French Ban

    In December 2003, French President Jacques Chirac announced that Muslim headscarves, Jewish skullcaps, and large crosses were to be banned in French public schools, arguing that he intended to uphold the principle of secularism, which is the “pillar of the French Constitution.” Though the decree was directed towards Muslim, Jewish, and Christian religious articles, critics argued that it specifically targeted France’s growing Muslim immigrant community. Chirac’s announcement set off an international controversy...

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    Jewish Interfaith Endeavors: Abrahamic Dialogue (2004)

    The following report is part of a series of pieces written in 2004 investigating the Jewish community's participation in interfaith dialogue.

    Since September 11, 2001, there has been an increased interest in Muslim religious dialogue among Jews and Christians, leading to what many identify as Abrahamic dialogue. This project employs Abraham as a figure that unites all three faiths. Whether the groups address him in conversation or invoke him only in name, Abraham becomes the symbolic father, the common denominator of monotheism. Below is a summary of the various...

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    Jewish Interfaith Endeavors: Orthodox Judaism (2005)

    The following report is part of a series of pieces investigating the Jewish community's participation in interfaith dialogue.

    Orthodox Judaism in general, and Modern Orthodoxy in particular, is in a state of transformation. On one side are the modernizers. Egalitarian minyanim (prayer groups) with no supervising rabbi, are cropping up in the US and Israel. Jews who for decades insisted that the entire land of Israel was a God-given right are now supporting unilateral withdrawal from Gaza and parts of the West Bank. Haviva Ner-David will soon be ordained as the first...

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    Jewish Interfaith Endeavors: Dabru Emet (2004)

    The following report is part of a series of pieces written in 2004 investigating the Jewish community's participation in interfaith dialogue.

    "Dabru Emet," literally "speak the truth," is a quote from Zechariah 8:16, in which the prophet informs Israel how to interact with other nations. Subtitled "A Jewish Statement on Christians and Christianity," Dabru Emet is a document created by the National Jewish Scholars Project that first appeared in the New York Times in 2000. In the introduction, the authors explain that because of the ways in which...

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    Jewish Interfaith Endeavors: Academic Programs (2004)

    The following report is part of a series of pieces investigating the Jewish community's participation in interfaith dialogue.

    Because they are grounded in theology and philosophy, interfaith studies have become a popular topic of conversation in colleges and universities. Besides articles in various academic journals, some institutions now have centers and programs solely devoted to the topic. In addition, many seminaries foster interfaith dialogue in hopes of engendering compassion, tolerance, and understanding among those who will later enter education and the clergy...

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    Native American Religious and Cultural Freedom: an Introductory Essay (2005)

    I. No Word for Religion: The Distinctive Contours of Native American Religions

    A. Fundamental Diversity We often refer to Native American religion or spirituality in the singular, but there is a fundamental diversity concerning Native American religious traditions. In the United States, there are more than five hundred recognized different tribes,...

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    Mapping Religious Diversity in Montana (2003)

    In a state with a total population of less than one million people, and not exactly known for its diversity, I set out in June 2003 to document the presence of various religious communities and to see how they are interacting with each other. Surprisingly to some, what I found was a considerable amount of established and growing religious diversity. What follows is a brief overview of some of the typical communities in Montana.

    Historical Diversity: Anabaptists, Chinese Immigrants, Native Americans

    First off, Montana has had a long... Read more about Mapping Religious Diversity in Montana (2003)

    "The Clock Can Never Be Turned Back": The Formation and Growth of Interfaith Groups in the Greater Boston Area (1993)

    "Something new and something good is happening," declared an African-America minister at an interreligious worship service in Boston. "We are discovering each other by bringing our gifts together and offering them to God," echoed a white Unitarian-Universalist minister at the same worship service. Reflecting upon this worship service with participants from Protestant, Roman Catholic, Unitarian-Universalist, Jewish, Muslim, Hindu, Buddhist, and Neo-Pagan faith traditions, a Protestant minister stated emphatically, "The clock can never be turned back!"[1]... Read more about "The Clock Can Never Be Turned Back": The Formation and Growth of Interfaith Groups in the Greater Boston Area (1993)

    Religious Diversity in Austin, TX: Come for the Economy, Stay for the Attitude (2003)

    According to the 2002 Census, 657, 688 people live within Austin city limits. Of that population, 129,163 are foreign born–about 19.64 percent.[1] This places Austin twenty-fifth on a list of large American cities with the highest percentages of foreign-born residents.[2] Because the Census measures only household population, these figures generally do not reflect the 4,500 international students at the University of Texas who have come from 115 different countries. Politically, Austin is considered by many...

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    Twin Cities' Responses to September 11 Attacks (2002)

    On September 11, 2001, a terrorist attack in New York resulted in the deaths of thousands. The innocent Americans killed in this attack were of various faiths, and the broader victims include everyone who considers America home, regardless of ethnicity or religious tradition. That awful day propelled the discussion of religion into the American public square. From new heights of fear of unfamiliar practices to a new awareness of the variety of religious communities in the United States, people all over the country who had no previous knowledge of the religious diversity in...

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    Interfaith Initiatives and Resources in Theological Education (2012)

    Today, a growing number of graduate theological institutions are seeking to prepare students to effectively lead in an increasingly multi-religious world. Below you will find examples of several intensive models offered at schools across the nation. This list is intended to be illustrative rather than comprehensive and we welcome suggestions for additional opportunities to be included here. Selected readings and information about degree programs specializing in interfaith studies are also highlighted.

    It is also worth noting the emergence of institutions such Zaytuna College,...

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